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Vortex Generators Making More Noise In Aviation

Vortex Generators Making More Noise In Aviation

09 Nov 14:00 by Pete Burden

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Vortex generators are continuing their spread as JetBlue has announced that it will retrofit the company's A320 jets with the noise reduction apparatus.

JetBlue has been following this course since 2015 by purchasing new aircraft with vortex generators already installed. Now, it has decided to retrofit the rest of its A320 fleet by 2021.

Vortex generators help to reduce aircraft noise by disrupting air flows over ports on the wing which often produce a whistling noise when readying to land.  With noise pollution a major concern for local residents as air traffic grows, this technology seems to be a timely step in the right direction.

Vortex generators have proven to be popular with Airlines in Europe, with Lufthansa was the first airline to begin operating with vortex generators in 2015.  Austrian Airlines is currently retrofitting its A320 lineup and Eurowings, with a number of generators already in service, will have completed a fleet retrofit in 2021.  In addition, Easyjet’s newer aircraft have the noise reduction devices installed.

“While the airline industry has benefited from advances in technology and efficiency leading to quieter planes and engines, the work is never done,” said Joe Bertapelle, Director Strategic Airspace Programs, JetBlue. “We’re pleased to incorporate this advancement across our Airbus fleet and contribute to our communities in a meaningful way as good corporate citizens.”